Summer's nearly here and we're itching for some adventure. While your YOKUU cleaning helpers take care of things at home, why not explore microbes in more exotic climes. Check out these 8 awesome spots where microbes create stunning natural wonders.

1. Mosquito Bay, Puerto Rico

Watch glowing waves - Mosquito Bay is the brightest bioluminescent bay in the world, thanks to millions of dinoflagellates in the water. These tiny guys light up blue-green when disturbed, putting on an amazing natural light show every night.

2. Rottnest Island, Australia

Take selfies at a pink lake - The vibrant pink lakes of Rottnest Island get their color from algae and bacteria that love salty conditions. Dunaliella salina and some friendly halophilic bacteria make the water blush pink. (A.k.a a perfect backdrop for your next Instagram post! 😉)

3. Pasteur's House, Arbois, France

Legacy of a Microbe Hunter - Louis Pasteur’s summer house in Arbois is where he made some groundbreaking discoveries about microbial fermentation. Visiting this place is like stepping back into the 19th century and seeing where the magic of pasteurization was born.

4. Rio Tinto, Spain

Mars on Earth - The Rio Tinto river’s deep red color comes from iron-dissolving bacteria like Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. These microbes thrive in the acidic water, making the place look like a scene straight out of a Martian landscape.

5. The White Cliffs of Dover, UK

Microbial Architects - These iconic cliffs are made of chalk, formed from the skeletal remains of microscopic algae that lived millions of years ago.

6. Mammoth Hot Springs, USA

Terraced Microbial Landscapes - Located in Yellowstone National Park, these terraced pools are colored by heat-loving bacteria. The different colors show various microbial communities thriving in the hot, mineral-rich waters, creating a beautiful, ever-changing painting.

7. Micropia Museum, Amsterdam, Netherlands

A Museum of Microbes - Micropia is a museum dedicated to the invisible world of microbes. With cutting-edge tech, you can see live microbes, learn about their impact on our lives, and even discover the microbes living on you. It’s a fun, eye-opening experience!

8. Alexander Fleming Laboratory Museum, London, UK

Birthplace of Penicillin - Located at St. Mary’s Hospital, this museum preserves the lab where Alexander Fleming discovered penicillin in 1928. This tiny microbe revolutionized medicine, and here, you can see where it all began.

Can't visit in person? Don't worry, you can visit virtually here!

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